Dutch Crossing Volume 38 Number 1

DUTCH CROSSING : JOURNAL OF LOW COUNTRIES STUDIES
Volume 38, Number 1, March 2014

http://www.maneyonline.com/toc/dtc/38/1

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Editorial
Ulrich Tiedau

ARTICLES

The Role of London and Other English Cities in the Development of Early Modern Dutch Language and Literature
Christopher Joby

‘Tableau Poétique’: A Recently Discovered Manuscript by the Flemish Painter-Poet Lucas D’Heere (1534–84)
Frederica Van Dam

The Performance of Commercial Knowledge in Eighteenth-Century Dutch and German Urban Drama
Cornelis van der Haven

The Cone and the Funnel: Adaptation (Criticism) and Gerard Reve’s De avonden
Jeroen Dera

Androgyny as an Ideal in Louis Couperus and Hugo Claus
Laura Lech and Maarten Klein

REVIEW

Colonial Memory. Contemporary Women’s Travel Writing in Britain and The Netherlands. By Sarah de Mul. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press. 2011.
Guido van Meersbergen

ABSTRACTS

The Role of London and Other English Cities in the Development of Early Modern Dutch Language and Literature
Christopher Joby
http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/0309656413Z.00000000045

In accounts of the emergence of a standard language, linguists often adopt what Richard J. Watts terms a ‘tunnel view’ of language, in which those features of a language’s history which do not contribute to the story of the standard language are marginalized or even ignored. In this article, I argue that those who write general histories of Dutch language and literature are sometimes guilty of adopting this ‘tunnel view’. I take the case of London in the early modern period and look at how three developments in Dutch language and literature at this time — the publication of religious literature, the writing of the first Dutch grammar, and the writing of sonnets in Dutch — each owes something to the presence of Dutch speakers in London in the second half of the sixteenth century. In each case, I then consider how these developments are recorded in general histories of Dutch language and literature. I also describe a number of cases elsewhere in England and conclude by offering a model — that of the tree — which may be useful for those who write such histories.

DOI: 10.1179/0309656413Z.00000000045

‘Tableau Poétique’: A Recently Discovered Manuscript by the Flemish Painter-Poet Lucas D’Heere (1534–84)
Frederica Van Dam
http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/0309656413Z.00000000046

At the library of Arbury Hall in Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England, a manuscript from the Ghent painter-poet Lucas D’Heere is treasured. The manuscript has not been published before and is not mentioned in publications on Lucas D’Heere. The discovery and study of the manuscript reveals important new information on the background, life, and work of the migrant painter and his surroundings. This article describes the material data of the manuscript and discusses the highlights of the document. Three core issues are stressed therein: the life of Lucas D’Heere as an exile, his professional activities as a painter, and his social network as revealed by the manuscript.

DOI: 10.1179/0309656413Z.00000000046

The Performance of Commercial Knowledge in Eighteenth-Century Dutch and German Urban Drama
Cornelis van der Haven
http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/0309656413Z.00000000047

This article explores the ways in which commercial knowledge is presented in eighteenth-century theatre texts from Amsterdam and Hamburg. It will be oriented on laying bare the different positions bearing on the exchange of this knowledge in these texts and address the ways in which the power structures of dramatic texts were transformed in order to open up the private sphere to discussions on public topics like the stock trade. A?collection of plays about the speculation and banking crises of 1720 and 1763 inventively negotiate the distribution of roles with regard to the exchange of commercial knowledge. Producing, receiving, and performing information is enacted by characters with conventionally passive parts who in these plays become active participants in the ‘game of commerce’. The family household (oikos) and the merchant class are presented as self-regulating bodies that should control the performance of economic knowledge. After 1750 a growing tension occurs between this ideal of self-regulation and the incapacity of characters to control an expanding knowledge production.

DOI: 10.1179/0309656413Z.00000000047

The Cone and the Funnel: Adaptation (Criticism) and Gerard Reve’s De avonden
Jeroen Dera
http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/0309656413Z.00000000048

This article discusses two adaptations of Gerard Reve’s De avonden (‘The Evenings’): Rudolf van den Berg’s 1989 movie and Dick Matena’s 2007 graphic novel. Arguing that the practice of fidelity criticism within the field of adaptation studies is highly problematic, the author proposes to study adaptations through Francesco Casetti’s concepts of ‘reappearance’ and ‘reprogramming the reception’. His analysis concentrates on elements of hypotext reappearing in new historical contexts and media, with a focus on the relation between the adaptation and the novel’s reception history. Regarding this relation, the article points out that Van den Berg’s movie resembles the psychological interpretation of De avonden, which was dominant in the 1960s and 1970s, whereas Matena’s graphic novel echoes the sociological interpretation which was characteristic of the time of the novel’s initial reception.

DOI: 10.1179/0309656413Z.00000000048

Androgyny as an Ideal in Louis Couperus and Hugo Claus
Laura Lech and Maarten Klein
http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/abs/10.1179/0309656413Z.00000000049

In this article we first discuss androgyny in art around 1900 and some of the related religious and philosophical background; then we show what can be found on this subject in Couperus, especially in his novel De berg van licht (‘The Mountain of Light’, 1905/06) and in the work of Hugo Claus, the Flemish author, who deals with this theme as well. The similarity between these authors reaches a climax in the novel Jessica!, in which Claus introduces a character, Louis Kuppers, who is entirely based on his great predecessor from the fin de siècle. Claus frequently quotes from Couperus’ work. Although Couperus and Claus seem to be totally different authors, we conclude that they both consider androgyny to be an ideal.

DOI: 10.1179/0309656413Z.00000000049