BeLgoLAb2

An exciting event next week at the British Library for translators and those interested in translation from a theoretical point of view. A mixture of practical workshops, academic papers and interdisciplinary discussion taking place over two days, BeLgoLAb2 is set to be a treat. The Dutch text that will be discussed in the translation workshop is Paul Ostaijen’s Bezette Stad, the recent translation of which by David Colmer was the subject of a recent ALCS blog. See below for further information on the events and the full programme.

 

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BeLgoLab 2017 Belgian Translations

Translation plays a major role in Belgian culture, both domestically – by enabling readers to access work produced in a different language community – and internationally, by disseminating work to wider audiences. Accordingly, BeLgoLab 2017 is devoted to translations of different kinds. It combines formal papers and discussions with practical workshops, where published English translations are compared with the originals (guidance materials supplied for non-specialists). The event is aimed at researchers and postgraduates in Comparative Literature and Translation Studies, as well as those in French and Dutch studies.

 

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Monday 6 March 2017: British Library, Knowledge Centre, Eliot RoomBookings for this session via dutch-enquiries@bl.uk

1330-1400 Registration

1400-1410 Welcome Adrian Armstrong (Queen Mary University of London), Marja Kingma (British Library)

1410-1525 Workshop on translation: Amélie Nothomb, ‘Fear and Trembling’ (‘Stupeur et tremblements’) Adrian Armstrong. Materials (from the published translation and the original) will be distributed on the day.

1525-1545 Tea/coffee
1545-1700 Workshop on translation: Paul van Ostaijen, ‘Occupied City’ (‘Bezette Stad’) Jane Fenoulhet (University College London). Materials (from the published translation and the original) will be distributed on the day.

 
1700-1800 Reception, kindly supported by the Embassy of the Kingdom of Belgium in London.

 

Tuesday 7 March 2017: Institute of Modern Languages Research (Senate House G35)
Bookings for this session via http://www.sas.ac.uk/events/event/7189

0900-0915 Welcome Adrian Armstrong, Marja Kingma

0915-0945 Translator’s choices in the literary field: Alex Brotherton’s translation of Gerard Walschap’s ‘Marriage/Ordeal’ (‘Trouwen’, ‘Celibaat’) Irving Wolters (University College London)

0945-1015 From Mobutu to Molenbeek: Cultural Translation in Contemporary Belgian Ethnic-Minority Writing in French Sarah Arens (University of Edinburgh)

1015-1030 Discussion

1030-1045 Tea/coffee

1045-1145 Round table: Translation and Belgium Adrian Armstrong, Marja Kingma

 

All events in the programme are free but those wishing to attend must register in advance with the venues. Please register separately for both days.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALCS Student Days 2017 (London)

The ALCS Student Days have been part of Dutch Studies in the UK for many years. Most students who undertake a course in Dutch at university will have participated at least once in the Days, which take place every other year. Every edition of the Days sees undergraduates and postgraduates from various departments descend on a host institution for 24 hours of culture, learning, creativity and getting to know one another.

Every Student Days includes an event with a visiting speaker and visits to local places with a Low Countries connection. Thus, the poets’ collective De dichters uit Epibreren held a poetry workshop in 1999, in 2001 the performance artist Tine Ruysschaert led a drama workshop and in 2005 De Woorddansers organised a poetry slam. In 2008 Stichting Passionate facilitated an afternoon workshop and an evening performance with Wilfred de Jong, and Ernest van der Kwast in Nottingham. In 2010 the Flemish Theatre Company Fast Forward offered language and drama workshops and in the evening a poetry performance, Als ik jou. In 2013 Passionate Bulkboek organised workshops and an evening performance with Rebecca Lenaerts, Daniel Dee, and Bouke Billiet.

This year the student days return to UCL with a jam-packed programme of cultural delights and practical training. Highlights include a hands-on workshop in subtitling from Cinema Bioscoop and a careers event looking at the value of Dutch when looking for a job. On Thursday 24th and Friday 25th of March, Bloomsbury will be alive with enthusiastic students speaking Dutch and learning about Low Countries culture together, any undergraduate or postgraduate from a university where Dutch is taught is warmly invited to join us!

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Programme:

Thursday 23.03.17

12.00                welcome and  lunch

13.30-17.30     subtitling  workshop  with CinemaBioscoop  and  the
UCL Centre for Translation Studies: work with a  range
of Dutch short films, make subtitles  ready for viewing
in the evening

18.30-late       film screenings and drinks at RADA Studios

Friday 24.03.17

10.00-13.00      career  morning:  range  of guest  speakers,  including journalist Tim de Wit (NOS radio and televisio) and many many former students on working with Dutch and its speakers.

Plenty of opportunity  over coffee and lunch to talk and mingle.

 

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Call for Researcher Low Countries Studies Survey

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It is good practice for any association to look periodically at their aims and objectives and to check if they are still getting things right. The last time the ALCS measured and mapped the field of Dutch Studies in the UK and Ireland was in 2006. 

More than ten years on, the Executive Committee feels that it is time for another ‘state of the field’. This time, in addition to mapping the teaching and academic research in all areas of Low Countries Studies (including the Dutch language and all aspects of Dutch and Flemish culture), we want to canvas the views of our members: is the ALCS doing the right things to fulfil our aims?

To carry out the research the Association for Low Countries Studies is looking for an enthusiastic (student) researcher to undertake this survey of the state of Low Countries Studies in Great Britain and Ireland.

If you think you are the right person to take on this research task, please send an expression of interest containing a brief outline of your research approach and timeline with a short CV to ALCS@sheffield.ac.uk

Deadline 8 February 2017

Call: Researcher Low Countries Studies Survey

 

ALCS Research Grant: Chris Joby visits Asian Library Leiden

leiden_asia_centre_yearThe ALCS sponsored Dr Chris Joby’s  research  visit to Leiden in January 2017. Joby reports.

‘I am very grateful to the ALCS for supporting this research visit. It allowed me to access many resources held at Leiden University Library, which I would otherwise not be able to access. One project that I am currently undertaking is to write a history of the Dutch language in Tokugawa Japan (c. 1603-1868). The East Asia library at Leiden houses editions of primary sources, such as the Deshima Daghregisters, and many secondary sources, which I was able to consult for this project. Another project that I am undertaking concerns a collection of correspondence written in Norwich in the late 1560s. The letters in the collection were written by immigrants from Ieper and elsewhere in the Westhoek. The visit to Leiden University library allowed me to consult specialist material on sixteenth-century Flemish, which I can now include in an article on this subject. I was also able to meet with other academics involved in East Asia studies with whom I could discuss my project and exchange ideas.

A research visit such as this also allows me to keep my Dutch current and identify useful material for my courses on Dutch language, literature and cultural history at Hankuk University.’

For more information on ALCS grant opportunitiesm check our Research Grants page.

 

40 years of Dutch Crossing

Dutch CrossingThe new issue of our Journal Dutch Crossing, March 2017, is a special one: it marks the journal’s RUBY jubilee: 40 years of Dutch Crossing: 1977 – 2017.

And if that isn’t enough reason for a celebration: Taylor & Francis has finished retro-digitising Dutch Crossing so, for the first time, this forty years body of interdisciplinary Low Countries Studies scholarship is now completely accessible online.

In his editorial, dr Ulrich Tiedau remembers the words of the Journal’s first editors, “we hope the title will serve, as Dutch has it, as a flag to cover a cargo as diverse as the interests and talents of its readers and contributors.” He adds that fourty years later, Dutch Crossing is still a ‘showcase’ of Dutch and Flemish culture and of the many connections between the Dutch- and English-speaking worlds.

For those interested in the history of the journal from 1977–2009 see Ulrich Tiedau, ‘A New Dutch Crossing’, Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies, vol. 33 (2009), No. 1, pp. 3–6.

Online Archive of Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies