ALCS Student Days 2017 (London)

The ALCS Student Days have been part of Dutch Studies in the UK for many years. Most students who undertake a course in Dutch at university will have participated at least once in the Days, which take place every other year. Every edition of the Days sees undergraduates and postgraduates from various departments descend on a host institution for 24 hours of culture, learning, creativity and getting to know one another. Every Student Days includes an event with a visiting speaker and visits to local places with a Low Countries connection. Thus, the poets’ collective De dichters uit Epibreren held a poetry workshop in 1999, in 2001 the performance artist Tine Ruysschaert led a drama workshop and in 2005 De Woorddansers organised a poetry slam. In 2008 Stichting Passionate facilitated an afternoon workshop and an evening performance with Wilfred de Jong, and Ernest van der Kwast in Nottingham. In 2010 the Flemish Theatre Company Fast Forward offered language and drama workshops and in the evening a poetry performance, Als ik jou. In 2013 Passionate Bulkboek organised workshops and an evening performance with Rebecca Lenaerts, Daniel Dee, and Bouke Billiet.

This year the student days return to UCL with a jam-packed programme of cultural delights and practical training. Highlights include a hands-on workshop in subtitling from Cinema Bioscoop and a careers event looking at the value of Dutch when looking for a job. On Thursday 24th and Friday 25th of March, Bloomsbury will be alive with enthusiastic students speaking Dutch and learning about Low Countries culture together, any undergraduate or postgraduate from a university where Dutch is taught is warmly invited to join us!

 

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Programme:

Thursday 23.03.17                                          12.00                welcome and  lunch

13.30-17.30     subtitling  workshop  with Cinema  Bioscoop  and  the
UCL Centre for Translation Studies: work with a  range
of Dutch short films, make subtitles  ready for viewing
in the evening

18.30-late       film screenings and drinks

Friday 24.03.17

10.00-13.00      career  morning:  range  of guest  speakers,  including
former students, on working with Dutch and its speakers.

Plenty of opportunity  over coffee and lunch to talk and mingle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

cinema

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Call for Papers: Postgraduate Colloquium in Low Countries Studies (London, 6th-7th July 2017)

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TELLING STORIES: CHANGING NARRATIVES IN LOW COUNTRIES HISTORY, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY

Thursday 6th and Friday 7th July 2017
Institute for Modern Languages Research, Senate House, London

Organised in association with the IMLR, ALCS, the University of Sheffield and University College London

Deadline for submission: Monday 27th February 2017


Following the success of the inaugural postgraduate colloquium ‘Drawing a Map’ in 2015, the Association of Low Countries Studies and its partners are pleased to announce our second biennial colloquium: ‘Telling Stories: Changing Narratives in Low Countries History, Culture, and Society’.

The study of the language and cultures of the Netherlands and Flanders continues to flourish in the British academy and this colloquium has been designed to foster closer ties within the next generation of scholars across all branches of our field. Recognising that the interwoven histories of the British Isles and the Low Countries mean there is a long tradition of cultural exchange and academic cooperation between both sides of the North Sea, the colloquium also seeks to forge closer links with young researchers from Belgium and The Netherlands, and from the field of international Dutch Studies worldwide. With this Colloquium we wish to promote the interdisciplinary study of the Netherlands and Belgium in its broadest definition.

imlrFocusing on narratives that have defined Dutch and Flemish culture, as well as the ways these cultural imaginings have shaped a range of transnational and international concepts, ‘Telling Stories’ aims to bring together scholars of Low Countries Studies across disciplines, institutions and national boundaries to consider the future role of Anglophone Dutch Studies within and beyond the academic institutions.

Entering uncertain political, cultural, and economic times, we must look beyond the remit of the traditional field of Neerlandistiek to consider our work in a global context, responding to the current challenges of the academic climate by bringing to light new perspectives on contemporary and historical issues in the field of Low Countries Studies.

‘Telling Stories’ is open to postgraduate students and early career researchers working on any aspect of Low Countries Studies. The colloquium will function to create a point of contact for researchers to engage in an inclusive mutual exchange of knowledge. We welcome applicants from any country and extend a warm invitation to those who wish to participate as observers.

We welcome proposals for papers of up to 20 minutes, panels of up to three papers and presentations in non-traditional formats (e.g. presentation of translations, posters) in English from MA and PhD students, and Early Career Researchers covering any area relating to Low Countries Studies. Topics may include, but are by no means limited to:

• Historical Narratives of the Low Countries in a European and Global Context
• Master Narratives of Netherlandic Culture
• Cultural and Identitarian Imaginings in Dutch and Flemish Literature
• Colonial and Postcolonial Narratives
• Storytelling through Dutch-Language Theatre, Performance, and Film
• Dutch/ Flemish Herstories
• Stories of the Self: Queer and Gender Studies in Dutch/Flemish Contexts
• Art History (Artistic Challenges to Popular Narratives, for example)
• Storying Anglo-Dutch/Belgian Relations
• The Low Countries in the European Narrative
• Contemporary Dutch/Flemish-speaking culture and politics
• Translating to/from Dutch and English
• The history and future of Low Countries Studies as a discipline

If you would like to participate, please send a proposal of no more than 300 words to the organising committee, c/o pglowcountriesstudies@gmail.com. Your proposal should contain the following information in one document:

• Your name, postal address, telephone number, and email address
• The name of the institution at which you are registered
• The media required for your presentation (e.g. data projector/laptop
[PowerPoint], VHS/DVD player, OHP, cd/cassette player, slide projector etc.)

Offers of papers/presentations must be made by Monday 27th February

Organising Committee: Jenny Watson (Swansea), Cyd Sturgess (Sheffield)
A conference fee of £15 for administrative costs and refreshments will be charged (committee and speakers included) but this will be waived for postgraduate students without funding support (including MA and final year PhD students). Bursaries for travel costs and accommodation are available.

Call for Researcher Low Countries Studies Survey

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It is good practice for any association to look periodically at their aims and objectives and to check if they are still getting things right. The last time the ALCS measured and mapped the field of Dutch Studies in the UK and Ireland was in 2006. 

More than ten years on, the Executive Committee feels that it is time for another ‘state of the field’. This time, in addition to mapping the teaching and academic research in all areas of Low Countries Studies (including the Dutch language and all aspects of Dutch and Flemish culture), we want to canvas the views of our members: is the ALCS doing the right things to fulfil our aims?

To carry out the research the Association for Low Countries Studies is looking for an enthusiastic (student) researcher to undertake this survey of the state of Low Countries Studies in Great Britain and Ireland.

If you think you are the right person to take on this research task, please send an expression of interest containing a brief outline of your research approach and timeline with a short CV to ALCS@sheffield.ac.uk

Deadline 8 February 2017

Call: Researcher Low Countries Studies Survey

 

ALCS Research Grant: Chris Joby visits Asian Library Leiden

leiden_asia_centre_yearThe ALCS sponsored Dr Chris Joby’s  research  visit to Leiden in January 2017. Joby reports.

‘I am very grateful to the ALCS for supporting this research visit. It allowed me to access many resources held at Leiden University Library, which I would otherwise not be able to access. One project that I am currently undertaking is to write a history of the Dutch language in Tokugawa Japan (c. 1603-1868). The East Asia library at Leiden houses editions of primary sources, such as the Deshima Daghregisters, and many secondary sources, which I was able to consult for this project. Another project that I am undertaking concerns a collection of correspondence written in Norwich in the late 1560s. The letters in the collection were written by immigrants from Ieper and elsewhere in the Westhoek. The visit to Leiden University library allowed me to consult specialist material on sixteenth-century Flemish, which I can now include in an article on this subject. I was also able to meet with other academics involved in East Asia studies with whom I could discuss my project and exchange ideas.

A research visit such as this also allows me to keep my Dutch current and identify useful material for my courses on Dutch language, literature and cultural history at Hankuk University.’

For more information on ALCS grant opportunitiesm check our Research Grants page.

 

40 years of Dutch Crossing

Dutch CrossingThe new issue of our Journal Dutch Crossing, March 2017, is a special one: it marks the journal’s RUBY jubilee: 40 years of Dutch Crossing: 1977 – 2017.

And if that isn’t enough reason for a celebration: Taylor & Francis has finished retro-digitising Dutch Crossing so, for the first time, this forty years body of interdisciplinary Low Countries Studies scholarship is now completely accessible online.

In his editorial, dr Ulrich Tiedau remembers the words of the Journal’s first editors, “we hope the title will serve, as Dutch has it, as a flag to cover a cargo as diverse as the interests and talents of its readers and contributors.” He adds that fourty years later, Dutch Crossing is still a ‘showcase’ of Dutch and Flemish culture and of the many connections between the Dutch- and English-speaking worlds.

For those interested in the history of the journal from 1977–2009 see Ulrich Tiedau, ‘A New Dutch Crossing’, Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies, vol. 33 (2009), No. 1, pp. 3–6.

Online Archive of Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies