ALCS Essay Prize 2011

The committee of the ALCS are delighted to congratulate Sophie Reece-Trapp and Dirk Schoenaers on their winning essays in the ALCS Essay Prize for 2011. The two winners each receive £100 and one year’s free membership of the ALCS, which includes a subscription for 2012 to our award-winning academic journal Dutch Crossing, including access to the complete online archive of Dutch Crossing via the publisher’s website.

In the undergraduate category, Sophie Reece-Trapp, from the University of Cambridge, drew together both postcolonial and feminist theory to produce a very thought-provoking analysis of several twentieth-century Curaçaoan literary works in an essay titled“The Paradox of Male Hegemony and the Subversive Role of Women in Dutch Curaçaoan Literature (1935-1990)” .

In the postgraduate / early career researcher category, our winner was Dr Dirk Schoenaers, from the University of Liverpool, with his article on “The Middle Dutch Translation of Froissart’s Chronicle (ca. 1450). Historiography in the Vernacular and the Ruling Elite of Holland.” Froissart’s chronicle – originally written in French, and relating the events that led up to the Hundred Years War and the first half of that war (1322-1400), was translated into Dutch in the mid-fifteenth century, and Schoenaers provided an illuminating analysis of Gerard Potter’s translation, a version which served the interests of the ruling elite of Holland.

Other entries received across the two categories covered a wide spectrum, from sociolinguistics to film studies – the first time we have had an entry in the latter area, we believe. As ever, it was enjoyable to read entries from across the range of disciplines, and we look forward to what next year’s entries will bring.

Once again, hearty congratulations to both our winners. The deadline for entries each year is September 30th, and essays on any area of Dutch/Low Countries studies are eligible.

ALCS Essay Prize 2010

The committee of the ALCS are delighted to congratulate Dr Alan Scott and Ms Alice Paul on their winning essays in the ALCS Essay Prize for 2010. The two winners each receive £100 and one year’s free membership of the ALCS, which includes a subscription for 2011 to our award-winning academic journal Dutch Crossing, including access to the complete online archive of Dutch Crossing via the publisher’s website.

In the undergraduate category, Alice Paul’s well-argued essay Van rookbommen tot witte fietsen : Een onderzoek naar de invloed van Provo van 1965 tot vandaag examined the activities and influence of the counter-culture movement Provo. In the category for Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers, Dr Scott’s winning essay tackled an area of Dutch language that many of us may be dimly aware of but have never given much thought. Titled The marking of feminine grammatical gender using female-marking suffixesDr Scott’s essayis a thought-provoking analysis of the habit in contemporary Dutch of using feminine suffixes, not just on animate nouns like koningin, dichteres, but, as his corpus data reveal, also referring to nouns that are inanimate, as in Het Onderwijs is behoedster van de cultuur(‘Education is the guardian[FEM] of culture’).

Other entries received across the two categories covered a wide spectrum, from the poetry of J.C. Bloem, to Dutch migrant literature, and – of interest to all of us who teach Dutch – the attitudes of British learners of Dutch to different native-speaker Dutch accents. It was pleasing to see a mix of entries across history, linguistics andliterature this year – and we look forward as ever to what next year’s entries will bring

Once again, hearty congratulations to both our winners. The deadline for entries each year is September 30th.

ALCS Essay Prize 2009

The committee of the ALCS are delighted to congratulate Dr Demmy Verbeke and Grant Price on their winning essays in the ALCS Essay Prize for 2009 . The two winners each receive £100 and one year’s free membership of the ALCS, which includes a subscription for 2010 to our award-winning academic journal Dutch Crossing, including access to the complete online archive of Dutch Crossing via the publisher’s website.

In the category for Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers, Dr Verbeke’s essay on Swag-bellied Hollanders and dead-drunk Almaines, a lively and scholarly study of two early modern English texts that claimed to be translations from the Dutch and German, won against stiff competition. Dr Verbeke’s essay will be published in Dutch Crossing in due course. One of the other entries received in this category will also be appearing in Dutch Crossing in the fullness of time – evidence of the high quality of the entries once again this year. As ever, it was a great pleasure to read all the entries in this category.

In the undergraduate category, the judges were impressed by the sound argument and structure of Grant Price’s detailed analysis of the connecting themes of parenthood and male rivalry in Karel Glastra van Loon’s novel De Passievrucht (1999). Other entries also dealt with literary topics, from the Middle Ages to the present day. The historians and linguists must have had a year off at the undergraduate level, but we look forward to contributions across the full range of Dutch Studies next year.

Once again, hearty congratulations to both our winners. The deadline for entries each year is September 30th.

ALCS Essay Prize 2008

The committee of the ALCS are delighted to congratulate Jasper van der Steen and David van der Linden for their winning essays in the ALCS Essay Prize for 2008. We received entries from the fields of sociolinguistics, contemporary literature, and Flemish history, but this year the two winning entries were both in the field of seventeenth-century Dutch history, and both explored the experiences of those living or travelling in a foreign country, but from complementary perspectives.

Jasper van der Steen was awarded the prize for the best postgraduate essay, for his essay titled “ ‘This nation was not made for me’: William III’s introduction to etiquette, ritual and ceremony at the English course, 1688-1691”, which examined the possible influences of William III’s ‘Dutchness’ on the cultural norms of English court and society – and of its influence on him. William adopted many of the rituals associated with the monarchy, despite his personal distaste for them, but drew the line, it appears, at the practice of the King’s Touch, which smacked too much of papist supersitition to him.

At the undergraduate level, the prize went to a study not of a Dutchman in England, but of the reverse: British travellers in the Netherlands. David van der Linden’s essay – which won in a very strong undergraduate field this year – is entitled “Lessons in Devotion: The religious experience of John Evelyn and the Puritan Sir William Brereton in the Dutch Republic”, and is a study of how these travellers in essence saw what they were looking for. Brereton the Puritan was struck by the pleasing simplicity and devotion of Church architecture and practice, while John Evelyn examined religion from the perspective of an interested but impartial observer, examining it alongside equally interesting developments in the arts and sciences.

We congratulate Jasper van der Steen and David van der Linden on their excellent work, and all the entrants for the very stimulating reading they provided the prize committee. We look forward to receiving your entries for 2009 by September 30 th. Jasper van der Steen and David van der Linden each receive a year’s free subscription to ALCS (including the journal Dutch Crossing), and £100.