Three multilingual poets in Sheffield

On Wednesday 18 March 2015, the Centre for Dutch Studies together with the Centre for Poetry and Poetics presents three multilingual poets: Maud Vanhauwaert (Belgium, Flemish), Ágnes Lehóczky (British-Hungarian) and the Galician poet Isaac Xubin. They will read from their poetry in Jessop West G.03 from 6pm. Wine will be served.

Since the publication of her debut volume Ik ben mogelijk, Maud Vanhauwaert has been awarded a number of prestigious literary prizes including the Herman de Coninck Public Award for her 2014 collection We are parallel_. Maud Vanhauwaert is also a prize-winning performer and short film maker. Students of Dutch from Sheffield, Nottingham and UCL have recently completed a translation of Wij zijn evenwijdig_ in a collaborative project with the author and translator David Colmer.

ALCS Essay Prize 2014

On 18 July 2014 the ALCS review committee awarded the 2014 ALCS essay prize for the best undergraduate entry. The winner receives £100 and a year’s membership to Dutch Crossing, our academic Journal.

ALCSprize Joel BakerThis year’s winner is Joel Baker. He wrote an excellent essay on ‘Fretz 2025: Towards a New Relationship Between Art and Politics’.

Joel is a final year undergraduate student at the University of Sheffield.

 

Notice of biennial General Meeting

The Tenth Biennial Conference of the Association takes place on 10-12 September 2014 at University College London. The Association’s Biennial General Meeting will be held from 9.00-10.00 on 12 September at UCL, Medawar G02.

One of the tasks of the General Meeting is to elect the Executive Committee for 2014-16. Under the constitution of the Association, the Executive Committee consists of a President, Secretary, Treasurer, and four ordinary members. The Committee may choose to co-opt a further maximum of four members. While existing members of the Committee are eligible to stand for re-election, other nominations are welcome and can be made at any time up to the start of the General Meeting on 12 September 2014. Nominations should include the names of a proposer and seconder and a statement of consent signed by the nominee.

The current Executive Committee wishes to propose the raising of the membership fee to £38 (£28 concessions) and the introduction of a new ‘benefactor’ rate of £75.

I look forward to seeing you at the conference in September.

Carol Fehringer,
Secretary ALCS

New Issue of Dutch Crossing

Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies
Special issue: Dutch and Flemish Strangers in Norfolk
Vol. 38, no. 2 (July 2014)

Guest Editorial
Christopher Joby

ARTICLES

Sources in the Norfolk Record Office which Relate to the History of Norfolk and the Low Countries
J.R. Alban

Eavesdropping on the Correspondence between the Strangers, Chiefly in Norwich, and their Families in the Low Countries 1567–70
Alastair Duke

Records Relating to the Strangers at the Norfolk Record Office
Frank Meeres

The Dutch Language in Early Modern Norfolk: A Social History
Christopher Joby

Dutch Poetry in Early Modern Norfolk
Christopher Joby

ABSTRACTS

Sources in the Norfolk Record Office which Relate to the History of Norfolk and the Low Countries
J.R. Alban
http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/0309656414Z.00000000053

Taking a random selection of documents from the Norfolk Record Office’s very extensive ‘Designated’ holdings of archives, this paper attempts to demonstrate the wealth of primary source material available in Norfolk for the study of the county’s relations with the Low Countries, over a period, which spans almost a millennium. It considers the ‘Strangers’ who came to Norfolk from the Low Countries during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, but it also seeks to set this group within a wider chronological canvas; the arrival of the ‘Strangers’ into the county was an important occurrence, but it was only one episode in a long history of links stretching across the North Sea, a fact which is sometimes overlooked. Close contacts between Norfolk and its nearest continental neighbours already existed in the Middle Ages and these have continued strongly up to the present time. Such links have undoubtedly had a significant impact on the county and its people, and have helped to shape Norfolk’s identity and character today. Many of the activities that stemmed from the relationships between Norfolk and the Low Countries generated records, which have survived in large numbers, and these help to tell a long and fascinating story.

DOI: 10.1179/0309656414Z.00000000053

Eavesdropping on the Correspondence between the Strangers, Chiefly in Norwich, and their Families in the Low Countries 1567–70
Alastair Duke
http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/0309656414Z.00000000054

Alba’s repression of Calvinism in the Low Countries provoked an exodus to London and other towns in south-east England, notably Norwich. Erratic communication between the fugitives and their families was carried on across the North Sea by word of mouth and by letter. The correspondence examined here throws light on religious concerns as well as on humdrum domestic matters. The survival of these letters also suggests that literacy among craftsmen in the southern Low Countries was relatively high, possibly higher than in south-east England in the later sixteenth century.

DOI: 10.1179/0309656414Z.00000000054

Records Relating to the Strangers at the Norfolk Record Office
Frank Meeres
http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/0309656414Z.00000000055

The Norfolk Record Office (NRO) contains a wide range of documents relating to the presence of the Strangers in Norfolk. Some of these documents, such as the Mayor’s Court Books, were kept by local officials. Other documents, for example the Norwich Strangers’ Book, were kept by the Strangers themselves. In this article I consider the details of some of these documents and reflect on their significance for our understanding of the Stranger community. I conclude by noting that there are no doubt other documents relating to the Strangers, which lie hidden in the NRO archive, and which offer a range of interesting research opportunities.

DOI: 10.1179/0309656414Z.00000000055

The Dutch Language in Early Modern Norfolk: A Social History
Christopher Joby
http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/0309656414Z.00000000056

In the early modern period thousands of people whose mother tongue was Dutch came to the English county of Norfolk. Whilst some of them only stayed for a short while, others settled and established communities in the towns of King’s Lynn, Thetford, and Great Yarmouth and the city of Norwich. Whilst the communities in the first two lasted only for a short period, those in Yarmouth and Norwich lasted for over one hundred years. In this article I consider the extent to which Dutch was both written and spoken in these towns and in other parts of the county such as the Fens. The principal domain in which Dutch was used was the church, but it was also used in the workplace, at home, and in other domains such as education and the administration of the communities. I conclude by considering how this use of Dutch has left its mark on the Norfolk dialect and its toponyms.

DOI: 10.1179/0309656414Z.00000000056

Dutch Poetry in Early Modern Norfolk
Christopher Joby
http://www.maneyonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/0309656414Z.00000000057

In early modern Norfolk there were several thousand people whose mother tongue was Dutch. A number of these wrote poems. Some of the earlier poems were refereyns, a form of verse popular in the late medieval period. In the seventeenth century the Norwich-born son of immigrants from Flanders, Jan Cruso, published two volumes of poetry in which he demonstrates mastery of the Dutch epigram and a newer form of verse, the Dutch alexandrine. We also find Dutch alexandrines on a memorial to the renowned minister of the Dutch church in Norwich, Johannes Elison. Taken together these and the other poems discussed in this article demonstrate that Dutch Strangers in Norfolk continued to use the Dutch language to write poetry and thus keep their Dutch heritage alive well into the seventeenth century.

DOI: 10.1179/0309656414Z.00000000054

Special Issue Queeste

Queeste, Journal of Medieval Literature in the Low Countries, will be devoting its 2015 Spring issue to literature and multilingualism (1100-1600). They invite articles on (collections) of texts providing evidence of the multilingual context, but also on theoretical approaches to language contact in the region. Specifics can be found in the attached call for contributions. Further information about Queeste may be accessed through the journal’s website (http://queeste.verloren.nl/).